Dynjandi waterfall
Regions

The Westfjords

Dynjandi waterfall Photo by Garðar Ólafs

One of Iceland's best kept secrets is undoubtedly the country's north-west corner, Experience the peace and quiet of the area known as the Westfjords.


Westfjords

Isolation has preserved the region in relatively unspoiled wilderness. Largely uninhabited, Iceland's Westfjords are frequently distinguished by travel guides as a destination of excellence, and are a must-see for any serious explorer.

Hornstrandir are located in the Westfjords' north-western corner, an uninhabited peninsula and nature reserve that is a haven for the Arctic fox as well as a variety of birdlife. The bird cliff Látrabjarg, on the west side of the Westfjords, which apart from hosting nearly half of the world's population of some bird species, is also the westernmost point of Europe. The spectacular Dynjandi, a set of waterfalls with an accumulated height of 100 meters, is another must-see.

The Westfjords are a true Icelandic wilderness, and are undoubtedly the ideal place for spotting birds, arctic foxes and other unique fauna in their natural habitats.

Tradition and heritage play a large role in the region's culture. The strong relation to the ocean is evident in the regional cuisine and folklore is as much alive in the Westfjords as anywhere else in Iceland, with museums dedicated to sorcery and witchcraft, as well as monsters and creatures from the sea.

The Westfjords are a true Icelandic wilderness, and are undoubtedly the ideal place for spotting birds, arctic fox, and other unique fauna in their natural habitats.

Dynjandi

The jewel of the Westfjords

The spectacular Dynjandi, a set of waterfalls with an accumulated height of 100 meters, is a must-see.
The many hot pools found in the Westfjords are especially relaxing in the stark winter surroundings Photo by Visit Westfjords
Kayaking is a fantastic way to enjoy the fjords with a view from the sea Photo by Visit Westfjords

Getting there

Despite being a remote region of Iceland, the Westfjords are quite accessible. There are two daily flights to Ísafjörður, the Westfjord's largest town, available all year round. Taking a car is also an option. The distance between Reykjavík and Ísafjörður is 455 km of paved road. Driving allows more flexibility while exploring the region. Please note that all the roads in the Westfjords are not paved, but still drivable and safe, especially by exercising caution. Bus trips are available from Reykjavík to Hólmavík all year and between Hólmavík and Ísafjörður in the summer.

Find out more about the Westfjords

Visit Westfjords